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Menu @ Empire Plaza

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A day without snacks or a meal without starters would be as dull as the proverbial 'all work and no play'! Snacks must ideally be tasty and easy to make, so you can indulge in them when hunger strikes between meals. It could be a finger food, a jar snack, or something you can whip up in a jiffy. Starters are also a category of snacks, but as the name suggests, they are served at the beginning of a meal, usually during parties or other elaborate meals where guests are present. Starters must be handily-sized and easy-to-serve, but exciting to behold! The presentation counts a lot. In this section, we present a range of starters and snacks, together with some serving suggestions too.

A lot of yummy greens, crunchy veggies and juicy fruits combined with a tangy or creamy dressing would make a lovely salad, which can be served as an accompaniment or a snack. Some salads are so filling that they can make a healthy and satiating meal by themselves. Relish some delicious options like the Lettuce, Green Apple and Blueberry Salad , Mixed Fruit Creole Salad and Simple Caesar Salad.

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The chicken is marinated in yogurt and seasoned with the spice mixture tandoori masala. Cayenne pepper, red chili powder or Kashmiri red chili powder is used to give it a fiery red hue. A higher amount of turmeric produces an orange color.

Tandoori chicken is a dish originating in the Indian subcontinent. It is widely popular in South Asia particularly India and Pakistan, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and the Western world. It consists of roasted chicken prepared with yogurt and spices.

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Indian spice box chicken


1. Make the Chilli-ginger garnish (see right), before you start the chicken.
2. Cut down the length of the green chillies, then remove the seeds by scraping them out with a teaspoon. You may want to wear rubber gloves for this job - fiery seeds can give the fingers a real chilli sting. Cut off the stalk ends, chop the chillies into rough pieces and put them in a blender or food processor. Peel and roughly chop the garlic and add to the chillies. Do the same with the ginger.
3. Pick the leaves off the coriander and drop them into the blender as you go (reserve the stems for the garnish). Tip in the yogurt and blitz everything to a puree. This can take a few minutes and you may have to stop the blender a few times to scrape all the gunge down from the sides - a rubber spatula will make this job much easier.
4. Peel, halve and thinly slice the onions. Pull the skin off the chicken, using kitchen paper to help you get a good grip. Heat the oil in a saute pan over a medium heat until hot - when you drop in a spice seed or two it should sizzle. Toss in the fennel and cumin seeds and let them crackle and pop for 10-20 seconds, stirring all the time so they don't burn. They're ready when you get a lovely whiff of warm nuts. If the oil starts to smoke, remove pan from the heat.
5. Plop in the butter and let it melt, then throw in the sliced onions and turn the heat down a tad. Stir to mix the onions and spice seeds, then cook for about 10 minutes until the onions are meltingly soft and tinged golden brown. Give them a vigorous stir now and then, but don't stir them too often or they won't take on any colour.
6. Push the onions to one side of the pan, then add the chicken thighs, smooth side down. Increase the heat to between medium and high and fry the chicken until it's golden brown on both sides. This should take about 15-20 minutes and you will need to turn the pieces over halfway (a pair of tongs are good for this). Watch carefully in case the onions start to brown too much - if they do, pile them up on top of the chicken.
7. Stir in some of the yogurt mixture and cook until it disappears - repeat a dollop at a time. Whizz 150ml/¼ pint cold water in the blender to use the last bits of the mixture and add to the pan with a pinch of salt. Stir until bubbling, scraping up any crispy bits. Reduce the heat to its lowest and cover the pan tightly. Simmer for 30-35 minutes or until the chicken is tender when pierced, stirring and turning halfway and adding a splash of hot water if the sauce is too dry. Serve sprinkled with finely chopped coriander stems and a little chilli garnish (put the rest in a bowl on the table).

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Soup is a primarily liquid food, generally served warm (but may be cool or cold), that is made by combining ingredients such as meat and vegetables with stock, juice, water, or another liquid.

Traditionally, soups are classified into two main groups: clear soups and thick soups. The established French classifications of clear soups are bouillon and consommé. Thick soups are classified depending upon the type of thickening agent used: purées are vegetable soups thickened with starch; bisques are made from puréed shellfish or vegetables thickened with cream; cream soups may be thickened with béchamel sauce; and veloutés are thickened with eggs, butter, and cream. Other ingredients commonly used to thicken soups and broths include egg,[1] rice, lentils, flour, and grains; many popular soups also include carrots and potatoes

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Biryani or Biriyani is derived from a Parsi word Birian which means fried. Biryani is also considered as a royal dish that always found its place in the royal kitchens. It is a special dish enjoyed by most of the great kings and rulers. Biryani has basmati rice as the star ingredient and is loaded with different flavorful spices. It is usually accompanied with a cool raita.

There are many variations of biryani depending on the ingredients as well as the region. Some of the types are Chicken biryani, Mutton biryani, Prawns biryani, Quail biryani, Turkey biryani, Duck biryani, Beef biryani, Vegetable biryani, Daal (Lentil biryani), Fish biryani, Mushroom biryani, Soya biryani and Egg biryani.

Some of the regional biryani variations include Hyderabadi biryani, Thalassery biryani, Mughlai biryani, Bombay biryani, Culcutta biryani, Sindhi biryani, Lucknowi biryani, Vaniyambadi biryani, Bhatkali biryani, Ambur biryani, Arcot biryani, Dindigul biryani, Memoni biryani, Karachi biryani, Sri Lankan Buryani, Thai biryani, British biryani, Burmese biryani, Mauritian biryani etc..

Pilaf (pilav, pulao, polu, pulav) is a much lighter dish in which rice is cooked with very few spices with/without some broth, meat or vegetables.

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Noodles are a staple food in many cultures made from unleavened dough which is stretched, extruded, or rolled flat and cut into one of a variety of shapes. A single noodle can be made, eaten, or extracted from a serving of noodles, but it is far more common to serve and eat many at once, and thus more common to see the plural form of the word.

While long, thin strips may be the most common, many varieties of noodles are cut into waves, helices, tubes, strings, or shells, or folded over, or cut into other shapes. Noodles are usually cooked in boiling water, sometimes with cooking oil or salt added. They are often pan-fried or deep-fried. Noodles are often served with an accompanying sauce or in a soup. Noodles can be refrigerated for short-term storage, or dried and stored for future use. The material composition or geocultural origin must be specified when discussing noodles.

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Paneer dishes can be made in various ways, either as a dry curry or with gravy. it can be combined with with veggies like peas, potatoes, capsicum, spinach or even with mushroom.

To make the paneer recipes, you can either buy ready made cottage cheese from market or you can also make paneer at home. i always prefer to make paneer at home since its cheaper and also more hygienic. homemade paneer is softer and better than the store brought one.

Paneer if often made on festive or celebratory occasions. also when there are guests at home. some of the paneer recipes mentioned below can be made, when guests arriving or you want to make a special dish for an occasion.

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